Modern prejudice and strength of conjunction error : overestimating proportions of minority employees

Wolfram, Hans-Joachim (2017) Modern prejudice and strength of conjunction error : overestimating proportions of minority employees. Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, 36(5), pp. 417-436. ISSN (print) 2040-7149

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
Text
Wolfram-H-J-38630-AAM.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (372kB) | Preview

Abstract

Modern prejudice was examined as a potential predictor of overestimating proportions of minority employees in gender-typed occupations. Strength of conjunction error was considered as an indicator of distorted perceptions of these proportions. Furthermore, we investigated whether the association between modern prejudice and strength of conjunction error was weaker for gender-untypical than for gender-typical targets. Modern prejudice was considered as a predictor of overestimations of black female employees in Study 1 (N = 183) and black female older employees in Study 2 (N = 409). Data was collected using internet-mediated questionnaires. In Study 1, modern racism, but not modern sexism, was associated with greater strength of conjunction error when respondents were presented with gender-typical targets. In Study 2, using a sample scoring higher on modern prejudice than in Study 1, modern racism, but not modern sexism and modern ageism, was associated with greater strength of conjunction error, irrespective of target occupation. Furthermore, there was an unexpected association between lower sexism and greater strength of conjunction error for gender-typical targets, but not for gender-untypical targets. The findings lend support to the ethnic-prominence hypothesis in that modern racism, but not modern sexism or modern ageism, was associated with greater strength of conjunction error. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that target non-prototypicality can dilute the effect of modern prejudice on strength of conjunction error. This is one of the rare studies examining attitudes and conjunction error in a work-relevant context, thereby bridging the gap between social cognition and applied psychology.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Business and management studies
Psychology
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Business and Law
Faculty of Business and Law > Kingston Business School (Department of Management) (from August 2013)
Depositing User: Hans Wolfram
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2017 09:59
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2017 15:36
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/38630

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page