Phytosome-hyaluronic acid systems for ocular delivery of L-carnosine

Abdelkader, H, Longman, MR, Alany, RG and Pierscionek, B (2016) Phytosome-hyaluronic acid systems for ocular delivery of L-carnosine. International Journal of Nanomedicine, 2016(11), pp. 2815-2827. ISSN (print) 1176-9114

Full text available as:
[img] Text
Abdelkader-H-35333-VoR.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (2MB)

Abstract

This study reports on L-carnosine phytosomes as an alternative for the prodrug N-acetyl-L-carnosine as a novel delivery system to the lens. L-carnosine was loaded into lipid-based phytosomes and hyaluronic acid (HA)-dispersed phytosomes. L-carnosine-phospholipid complexes (PC) of different molar ratios, 1:1 and 1:2, were prepared by the solvent evaporation method. These complexes were characterized with thermal and spectral analyses. PC were dispersed in either phosphate buffered saline pH 7.4 or HA (0.1% w/v) in phosphate buffered saline to form phytosomes PC1:1, PC1:2, and PC1:2 HA, respectively. These phytosomal formulations were studied for size, zeta potential, morphology, contact angle, spreading coefficient, viscosity, ex vivo transcorneal permeation, and cytotoxicity using primary human corneal cells. L-carnosine-phospholipid formed a complex at a 1:2 molar ratio and phytosomes were in the size range of 380-450 nm, polydispersity index of 0.12-0.2. The viscosity of PC1:2 HA increased by 2.4 to 5-fold compared with HA solution and PC 1:2, respectively; significantly lower surface tension, contact angle, and greater spreading ability for phytosomes were also recorded. Ex vivo transcorneal permeation parameters showed significantly controlled corneal permeation of L-carnosine with the novel carrier systems without any significant impact on primary human corneal cell viability. Ex vivo porcine lenses incubated in high sugar media without and with L-carnosine showed concentration-dependent marked inhibition of lens brunescence indicative of the potential for delaying changes that underlie cataractogenesis that may be linked to diabetic processes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This work was supported by The Cultural Affairs and Missions Sector, Ministry of Higher Education, Cairo, Egypt and the Leverhulme Trust.
Research Area: Chemistry
Pharmacy
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing
Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing > School of Pharmacy and Chemistry
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Katrina Clifford
Date Deposited: 27 Jun 2016 08:17
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 10:52
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/35333

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page