Message

On Tuesday October 24th between 7am and 9am, we will carry out scheduled maintenance of the network. During this period of time, there may be potential outages, and the repository may be unavailable.

Thank you for your attention. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Does the ‘diffusion of innovations’ model enrich understanding of research use? Case studies of the implementation of thrombolysis services for stroke

Boaz, Annette, Baeza, Juan and Fraser, Alec (2016) Does the ‘diffusion of innovations’ model enrich understanding of research use? Case studies of the implementation of thrombolysis services for stroke. Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, ISSN (print) 1355-8196 (Epub Ahead of Print)

Full text available as:
[img] Text
Boaz-A-34801-AAM.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (112kB)

Abstract

Objective To test whether the model of ‘diffusion of innovations’ enriches understanding of the implementation of evidence-based thrombolysis services for stroke patients.Methods Four case studies of the implementation of evidence on thrombolysis in stroke services in England and Sweden. Semistructured interviews with 95 staff including doctors, nurses and managers working in stroke units, emergency medicine, radiology, the ambulance service, community rehabilitation services and commissioners.Results The implementation of thrombolysis in acute stroke management benefited from a critical mass of the factors featured in the model including: the support of national and local opinion leaders; a strong evidence base and financial incentives. However, while the model provided a starting point as an organizational framework for mapping the critical factors influencing implementation, to understand properly the process of implementation and the importance of the different factors identified, more detailed analyses of context and, in particular, of the human and social dimensions of change was needed.Conclusions While recognising the usefulness of the model of diffusion of innovations in mapping the processes by which diffusion occurs, the use of methods that lend themselves to in-depth analysis, such as ethnography and the application of relevant bodies of social theory, are needed.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Health services research
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Susan Miles
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2016 07:20
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2016 07:20
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/34801

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page