Scaling up from convictions to self-reported offending

Theobald, Delphine, Farrington, David P., Loeber, Rolf, Pardini, Dustin A. and Piquero, Alex R. (2014) Scaling up from convictions to self-reported offending. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 24(4), pp. 265-276. ISSN (print) 0957-9664

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Abstract

AIM: The main aims of this article are to estimate the number of offences that are committed for every one that leads to conviction, and to estimate the probability of an offender being convicted. METHOD: In the Pittsburgh Youth Study, 506 boys were followed up from age 13 to age 24 years, in interviews and criminal records. Self-reports and convictions for serious theft, moderate theft, serious violence and moderate violence were compared. RESULTS: On average, 22 offences were self-reported for every conviction. This scaling-up factor increased with age and was the highest for moderate theft and the lowest for serious theft. The probability of a self-reported offender being convicted was 54%. This percentage increased with the frequency and seriousness of offending and was always higher for African American boys than for Caucasian boys. These race differences probably reflected differences in exposure to risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: More research is needed on scaling-up factors, on frequent and serious offenders who are not convicted, on self-reported non-offenders who are convicted and on why African American boys are more likely than Caucasian boys to be convicted.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This work was supported by National Institute on Drug Abuse [grant numbers DA411018, DA034608), National Institute of Mental Health [grant numbers MH48890, MH50778, MH078039], Pew Charitable Trusts, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [grant numbe 96-MU-FX-0012] and Pennsylvania Depratment of Health.
Research Area: Psychology
Sociology
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > School of Psychology, Criminology and Sociology (from November 2012)
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Cheryl Clark
Date Deposited: 23 Jun 2015 09:17
Last Modified: 13 Aug 2015 15:08
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/31963

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