Leading team learning: what makes interprofessional teams learn to work well?

Chatalalsingh, Carole and Reeves, Scott (2014) Leading team learning: what makes interprofessional teams learn to work well? Journal of Interprofessional Care, 28(6), pp. 513-518. ISSN (print) 1356-1820

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Abstract

This article describes an ethnographic study focused on exploring leaders of team learning in well-established nephrology teams in an academic healthcare organization in Canada. Employing situational theory of leadership, the article provides details on how well established team members advance as "learning leaders". Data were gathered by ethnographic methods over a 9-month period with the members of two nephrology teams. These learning to care for the sick teams involved over 30 regulated health professionals, such as physicians, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, dietitians and other healthcare practitioners, staff, students and trainees, all of whom were collectively managing obstacles and coordinating efforts. Analysis involved an inductive thematic analysis of observations, reflections, and interview transcripts. The study indicated how well established members progress as team-learning leaders, and how they adapt to an interprofessional culture through the activities they employ to enable day-to-day learning. The article uses situational theory of leadership to generate a detailed illumination of the nature of leaders' interactions within an interprofessional context.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: interprofessional collaboration, interprofessional teams, leaders, situational leadership, team learning
Research Area: Health services research
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education
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Depositing User: Automatic Import Agent
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 14:01
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2014 14:05
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/29727

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