Can activity within the external abdominal oblique be measured using real-time ultrasound imaging?

John , E. K. and Beith, I. D. (2007) Can activity within the external abdominal oblique be measured using real-time ultrasound imaging? Clinical Biomechanics, 22(9), pp. 972-979. ISSN (print) 0268-0033

Full text not available from this archive.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Differences in the function of the anterolateral abdominal muscles have been the subject of much investigation, but primarily using electromyography. Recently changes in thickness of transversus abdominis and internal oblique measured from real-time ultrasound images have been shown to represent activity within these muscles. However it is still unclear if such a change in thickness in external oblique similarly represents activity within that muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between change in thickness and muscle activity in the external oblique using real-time ultrasound and surface electromyography. METHODS: Simultaneous measurements of electromyography and real-time ultrasound images of external oblique were studied in up to 24 subjects during two tasks compared to the muscle at rest (1) isometric trunk rotation and (2) drawing in the lower abdomen. FINDINGS: Changes in muscle thickness correlated significantly with electromyography during isometric trunk rotation in the majority of subjects but with a significant difference between subjects. In contrast, the relationship between change in thickness and electrical activity in the muscle when drawing in the lower abdomen was significant in less than 50% of subjects and the muscle often got thinner. INTERPRETATION: Thickness changes of external oblique can be used as a valid indicator of electromyography activity during isometric trunk rotation, though the relationship is not as good as previously published data for transversus abdominis. Thickness changes of external oblique measured during lower abdominal drawing in cannot be used to detect activity within this muscle.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Allied health professions and studies
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences (until 2013)
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Gemma Sansom
Date Deposited: 16 Aug 2010 12:55
Last Modified: 16 Aug 2010 12:55
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/15787

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page