A twin study exploring the association between childhood emotional and behaviour problems and specific psychotic experiences in a community sample of adolescents

Shakoor, Sania, McGuire, Philip, Cardno, Alastair, Freeman, Daniel and Ronald, Angelica (2018) A twin study exploring the association between childhood emotional and behaviour problems and specific psychotic experiences in a community sample of adolescents. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 59(5), pp. 565-573. ISSN (print) 0021-9630

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
Text
Shakoor-S-39860-VoR.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (231kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background Childhood emotional and behaviour problems are antecedents for later psychopathology. This study investigated genetic and environmental influences shaping the longitudinal association between childhood emotional and behaviour problems and specific PEs. Method In a community‐based twin sample, parents reported on emotional and behaviour problems when twins were ages 7 and 12 years. At age 16 years, specific PEs were measured using self‐reports and parent reports. Structural equation model‐fitting was conducted. Results Childhood emotional and behaviour problems were significantly associated with paranoia, cognitive disorganisation and parent‐rated negative symptoms in adolescence (mean r = .15–.38), and to a lesser extent with hallucinations, grandiosity and anhedonia (mean r = .04‐.12). Genetic influences on childhood emotional and behaviour problems explained significant proportions of variance in adolescent paranoia (4%), cognitive disorganisation (8%) and parent‐rated negative symptoms (3%). Unique environmental influences on childhood emotional and behaviour problems explained ≤1% of variance in PEs. Common environmental influences were only relevant for the relationship between childhood emotional and behaviour problems and parent‐rated negative symptoms (explaining 28% of variance) and are partly due to correlated rater effects. Conclusions Childhood emotional and behaviour problems are significantly, if weakly, associated with adolescent PEs. These associations are driven in part by common genetic influences underlying both emotional and behaviour problems and PEs. However, psychotic experiences in adolescence are largely influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are independent of general childhood emotional and behaviour problems, suggesting they are not merely an extension of childhood emotional and behaviour problems. Supporting Information

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This work was supported by the Medical Research Council [grant numbers G1100559, G0901245 and G0500079].
Research Area: Psychiatry, neuroscience and clinical psychology
Psychology
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (until 2017) > School of Psychology, Criminology and Sociology (from November 2012)
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Katrina Clifford
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2017 14:48
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2018 14:55
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12839
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/39860

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page