The importance of thinking styles in predicting binge eating

Nikcevic, A.V., Marino, C., Caselli, G. and Spada, M.M. (2017) The importance of thinking styles in predicting binge eating. Eating Behaviors, 26, pp. 40-44. ISSN (print) 1471-0153

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Abstract

Impulsivity, Body Mass Index, negative emotions and irrational food beliefs are often reported as predictors of binge eating. In the current study we explored the role played by two thinking styles, namely food thought suppression and desire thinking, in predicting binge eating among young adults controlling for established predictors of this condition. A total of 338 university students (268 females) participated in this study by completing a battery of questionnaires measuring the study variables. Path analysis revealed that impulsivity was not associated with binge eating, that Body Mass Index and negative emotions predicted binge eating, and that irrational food beliefs only influenced binge eating via food thought suppression and desire thinking. In conclusion, thinking styles appear an important predictor of binge eating and they should be taken into consideration when developing clinical interventions for binge eating.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Psychology
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (until 2017) > School of Psychology, Criminology and Sociology (from November 2012)
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Depositing User: Katrina Clifford
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2017 14:18
Last Modified: 10 Jul 2018 02:05
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2017.01.002
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/37230

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