A cross-sectional exploratory analysis between pet ownership and sleep, exercise, health and neighborhood perceptions : The Whitehall II cohort study

Mein, Gill and Grant, Robert (2018) A cross-sectional exploratory analysis between pet ownership and sleep, exercise, health and neighborhood perceptions : The Whitehall II cohort study. BMC Geriatrics, 18(176), ISSN (online) 1471-2318

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
Text
Mein-G-37016-VoR.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (613kB) | Preview

Abstract

A cross-sectional exploratory analysis between pet ownership and sleep, exercise, health and neighbourhood perceptions: The Whitehall II cohort study Gill Mein (corresponding author), Robert Grant. Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education. Kingston University and St George’s University of London Background: To explore associations between pets, and specifically dog ownership and sleep, health, exercise and neighbourhood. Methods: Cross sectional examination of 6575 participants of the Whitehall II study aged between 59-79 years. We used self-assessed measurement scales of the Short Form (SF36), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), Control, Autonomy, Self-realisation and Pleasure (CASP), Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), sleep, exercise, and perceptions of local neighbourhood. In addition the Mini Mental State Examination which is administered to test global cognitive status (MMSE) Results: We found 2/7 people owned a pet and of those 64% were “very” attached to their pet. Mild exercise in metabolic equivalents (MET-hours) was significantly higher in pet owners than non-owners (median 27.8 (IQR 18.1 to 41.8) vs 25.7 (IQR 16.8 to 38.7), p=0.0001), and in dog owners than other pets (median 32.3 (IQR 20.8 to 46.1) vs 25.6 (IQR 16.8 to 38.5), p<0.0001). Moderate exercise was also significantly higher in pet owners than non pet owners (median 11.8 (IQR 4.2 to 21.9) vs 9.8 (IQR 2.8 to 19.5), p<0.0001), and dog owners than owners of other pets (median 12.3 (IQR 4.2 to 22.2) vs 10.1 (3.1 to 20.0), p=0.0002) but there were no significant differences with vigorous exercise. We found that pet owners were significantly more positive about their neighbourhood than non-owners on 8/9 questions, while dog owners were (significantly) even more positive than owners of other pets on 8/9 questions. Associations with sleep were mixed, although dog owners had less trouble falling asleep than non-dog owners, with borderline statistical significance. Conclusion: Dog owners feel more positive about their neighbourhood, do more exercise, and fall asleep more easily than non-dog owners. These results suggest that dog owners could be more likely to exercise by walking their dogs and therefore may be more familiar and positive about the area in which they walk their dog.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This work was supported by the Medical Research Council [grant number: MR/K013351/1]; British Heart Foundation [grant numbers: PG/11/63/29011 and RG/13/2/30098]; National Heart Lung and Blood Institute [grant number: R01HL36310], US, NIH: National Institute on Aging [grant numbers: R01AG13196 and R01AG34454], US, NIH; Agency for Health Care Policy Research [grant number: HS06516]; and the Dunhill Medical Trust [grant number: R247/0512].
Uncontrolled Keywords: sleep, pets, dogs, exercise, neighbourhood perceptions
Research Area: Epidemiology and public health
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education > School of Allied Health, Midwifery and Social Care
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Gillian Mein
Date Deposited: 17 Sep 2018 14:35
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2018 11:12
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-018-0867-3
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/37016

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page