Crowd behaviour analysis and simulation

Jablonski, Konrad (2014) Crowd behaviour analysis and simulation. (MSc(R) thesis), Kingston University, .

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Abstract

Crowd simulations are widely used for entertainment, evacuation training, architectural design and numerous other applications. In most scenarios the crowds are expected to move and act in a human like manner. Consequently, having realistic crowd behaviours has become increasingly important. In this thesis we propose novel methods for simulation crowd behaviours in 3D environments and a novel crowd evaluation framework for evaluation of those crowds. The novel crowd algorithm is using a variety of different techniques to improve the realism of its simulations. Each agent in the simulation possesses its own personal interests and needs, which affects its ultimate goals, interactions with the environment and other agents. Knowledge spreading behaviour is used throughout the algorithm as well. This means that the agents are not only aware of their close surroundings; they are informed by other agents about what is happening in other areas. This results in more accurate behaviors in agents compared to the actual people that are being simulated. The aim of this research is to improve the simulation of crowds and to find better ways of measuring accuracy of simulations compared to real world data. The novel evaluation framework was produced to accurately measure the crowd simulations compared to real world scenarios. By using various different techniques such as Optical Flow, HOOF, the simulation can be accurately measured at low cost and high efficiency.

Item Type: Thesis (MSc(R))
Physical Location: This item is held in stock at Kingston University library.
Research Area: Computer science and informatics
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing (until 2017) > Digital Imaging Research Centre (DIRC)
Depositing User: Jennifer May
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2016 11:46
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2018 10:17
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/35909

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