Interdiction and indoctrination: The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015

Blackbourn, Jessie and Walker, Clive (2016) Interdiction and indoctrination: The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015. Modern Law Review, 79(5), pp. 840-870. ISSN (print) 0026-7961

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Abstract

Lying behind the recent Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 is the phenomenon of foreign terrorist fighters which has sparked international and national attention. The 2015 Act deals with many facets of counter terrorism legislation, but its two principal measures are singled out for analysis and critique in this paper. Thus, Part I seeks to interdict foreign terrorist fighters by preventing suspects from travelling and dealing decisively with those already here who pose a risk. The second, broader aspect, of legislative policy, reflecting the UN emphasis on ‘Countering Violent Extremism’, is implemented through the statutory elaboration and enforcement in Part V of the ‘Prevent’ element of the long-established Countering International Terrorism strategy, which aims to stop people becoming terrorists or supporting violent extremism. These measures are explained in their policy contexts and set against criteria of effectiveness, personal freedom, and accountability.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Terrorism; Security; Foreign fighters; Prevent; Travel
Research Area: Law
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (until 2017)
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (until 2017) > School of Economics, History and Politics (from November 2012)
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Depositing User: Susan Miles
Date Deposited: 30 Mar 2016 10:05
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2017 10:22
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/34025

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