Cognitive and adaptive routing framework for mobile ad-hoc networks

Ramrekha, Tipu Arvind (2012) Cognitive and adaptive routing framework for mobile ad-hoc networks. (PhD thesis), Kingston University, uk.bl.ethos.602303.

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Abstract

In this thesis, we investigate the field of distributed multi-hopped routing in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs). MANETs are suitable for autonomous communication in remote areas lacking infrastructures or in situations where destruction of existing infrastructures prevail. One such important communication service domain is in the field of Public Protection and Disaster Relief (PPDR) services where rescuers require high bandwidth mobile communications in an ad hoc fashion. The main objectives of this thesis is to investigate and propose a realistic framework for cognitive MANET routing that is able to adapt itself to the requirements of users while being constrained by the topological state. We propose to investigate the main proactive and reactive emerging standard MANET routing protocols at the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and extend their functionalities to form a cognitive and adaptive routing approach. We thus propose a cognitive and adaptive routing framework that is better suited for diverse MANET scenarios than state-of-the art protocols mainly in terms of scalability. We also design our approach based on realistic assumptions and suitability for modern Android and iOS devices. In summary, we introduce the area of MANET routing and the state of the art in the field focussing on scalable routing approaches, derive QoS routing models for variable sized MANETs and validate these models using event based ns-2 simulations and analyse the scalable performance of current approaches. As a result we present and evaluate our novel converged cognitive and adaptive routing protocol called ChaMeLeon (CML) for PPDR scenarios. A realistic "Cognitive and Adaptive Module" is then presented that has been implemented in modern smart devices. Finally, we end the thesis with our conclusions and avenues for future work in the field.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Additional Information: This work was supported by the EU FP7 ICT PEACE Project.
Physical Location: This item is held in stock at Kingston University library.
Research Area: Computer science and informatics
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing (until 2017) > School of Computing and Information Systems
Depositing User: Arvind Ramrekha
Date Deposited: 03 May 2014 12:49
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2018 10:14
DOI: uk.bl.ethos.602303
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/22795

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