Windy weather and low humidity are associated with an increased number of hospital admissions for acute pain and sickle cell disease in an urban environment with a maritime temperate climate

Jones, Simon, Duncan, Edward R., Thomas, Nikki, Walters, Joan, Dick, Moira C., Height, Susan E., Stephens, Adrian D., Thein, Swee Lay and Rees, David C. (2005) Windy weather and low humidity are associated with an increased number of hospital admissions for acute pain and sickle cell disease in an urban environment with a maritime temperate climate. British Journal Of Haematology, 131(4), pp. 530-533. ISSN (print) 0007-1048

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Abstract

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterised by intermittent episodes of acute severe pain, related to vaso-occlusion. Environmental factors are thought to play an important role, and studies in tropical countries have suggested that cold and rainy seasons are associated with increased episodes of acute pain. We have studied retrospectively the number of admissions with acute pain and SCD to King's College Hospital, London, together with daily meteorological records collected locally. Data from 1400 d and 1047 separate admissions were analysed. Increased admissions were significantly associated with increased wind speed and low humidity, but showed no relationship to temperature, rainfall or barometric pressure. The strongest effect was for (maximum wind speed)/humidity, with 464 admissions on days in the lowest two quartiles of this parameter and 582 in the highest quartiles. The effect of high wind and low humidity is likely to be related to skin cooling.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Biological sciences
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Computing, Information Systems and Mathematics (until 2011)
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Depositing User: Automatic Import Agent
Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2010 11:41
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2010 11:41
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/7102

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