Student nurse selection and predictability of academic success : the Multiple Mini Interview project

Gale, Julia, Ooms, Ann, Grant, Robert, Paget, Kris and Marks-Maran, Di (2016) Student nurse selection and predictability of academic success : the Multiple Mini Interview project. Nurse Education Today, 40, pp. 123-127. ISSN (print) 0260-6917

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
Text
Gale-J-34835-AAM.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (277kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: With recent reports of public enquiries into failure to care, universities are under pressure to ensure that candidates selected for undergraduate nursing programmes demonstrate academic potential as well as characteristics and values such as compassion, empathy and integrity. The Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) was used in one university as a way of ensuring that candidates had the appropriate numeracy and literacy skills as well as a range of communication, empathy, decision-making and problem-solving skills as well as ethical insights and integrity, initiative and team-work. OBJECTIVES: To ascertain whether there is evidence of bias in MMIs (gender, age, nationality and location of secondary education) and to determine the extent to which the MMI is predictive of academic success in nursing. DESIGN: A longitudinal retrospective analysis of student demographics, MMI data and the assessment marks for years 1, 2 and 3. SETTINGS: One university in southwest London. PARTICIPANTS: One cohort of students who commenced their programme in September 2011, including students in all four fields of nursing (adult, child, mental health and learning disability). METHODS: Inferential statistics and a Bayesian Multilevel Model. RESULTS: MMI in conjunction with MMI numeracy test and MMI literacy test shows little or no bias in terms of ages, gender, nationality or location of secondary school education. Although MMI in conjunction with numeracy and literacy testing is predictive of academic success, it is only weakly predictive. CONCLUSIONS: The MMI used in conjunction with literacy and numeracy testing appears to be a successful technique for selecting candidates for nursing. However, other selection methods such as psychological profiling or testing of emotional intelligence may add to the extent to which selection methods are predictive of academic success on nursing.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Education
Nursing and midwifery
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Ann Ooms
Date Deposited: 06 Apr 2016 09:09
Last Modified: 14 Feb 2017 03:30
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/34835

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page