Euro Heart Survey 2009 Snapshot: regional variations in presentation and management of patients with AMI in 47 countries

Puymirat, E., Battler, A., Birkhead, J., Bueno, H., Clemmensen, P., Cottin, Y., Fox, K. A., Gorenek, B., Hamm, C., Huber, K., Lettino, M., Lindahl, B., Muller, C., Parkhomenko, A., Price, S., Quinn, T., Schiele, F., Simoons, M., Tatu-Chitoiu, G., Tubaro, M., Vrints, C., Zahger, D., Zeymer, U. and Danchin, N. (2013) Euro Heart Survey 2009 Snapshot: regional variations in presentation and management of patients with AMI in 47 countries. European Heart Journal. Acute Cardiovascular Care, 2(4), pp. 359-370. ISSN (print) 2048-8726

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Abstract

AIMS: Detailed data on patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) on a European-wide basis are lacking. The Euro Heart Survey 2009 Snapshot was designed to assess characteristics, management, and hospital outcomes of AMI patients throughout European Society of Cardiology (ESC) member countries in a contemporary 'real-world' setting, using a methodology designed to improve the representativeness of the survey. METHODS: Member countries of the ESC were invited to participate in a 1-week survey of all patients admitted for documented AMI in December 2009. Data on baseline characteristics, type of AMI, management, and complications were recorded using a dedicated electronic form. In addition, we used data collected during the same time period in national registries in Sweden, England, and Wales. Data were centralized at the European Heart House. RESULTS: Overall, 4236 patients (mean age 66±13 years; 31% women) were included in the study in 47 countries. Sixty per cent of patients had ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, with 50% having primary percutaneous coronary intervention and 21% fibrinolysis. Aspirin and thienopyridines were used in >90%. Unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparins were the most commonly used anticoagulants. Statins, beta-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were used in >80% of the patients. In-hospital mortality was 6.2%. Regional differences were observed, both in terms of population characteristics, management, and outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital mortality of patients admitted for AMI in Europe is low. Although regional variations exist in their presentation and management, differences are limited and have only moderate impact on early outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Epidemiology and public health
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education
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Depositing User: Clive Allnutt
Date Deposited: 27 Jan 2016 11:29
Last Modified: 27 Jan 2016 11:29
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/34028

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