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Graphene-Alumina Nanocomposites with Improved Mechanical Properties for Biomedical Applications.

Liu, Jian, Yang, Yang, Hassanin, Hany, Jumbu, Neeraj, Deng, Sunan, Zuo, Qian and Jiang, Kyle (2016) Graphene-Alumina Nanocomposites with Improved Mechanical Properties for Biomedical Applications. ACS applied materials & interfaces, ISSN (print) 1944-8244 (Epub Ahead of Print)

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Abstract

This paper presents a study on graphene platelet (GPL)-reinforced alumina (Al2O3) ceramic composites and the relationships between the loading of GPL and both mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility. Al2O3 powders with different GPL contents were prepared and sintered using a gas protected pressure-less furnace. The examination of the results shows the density of the composites varying from 99.2% to 95.6% with the loading of GPL from 0.75 to 1.48 vol %. Raman studies show that moderate agglomerations of GPLs occur during the ball milling process and graphitic defects were produced during the high temperature processing. Mechanical properties of the Al2O3 matrix are significantly improved by adding GPLs. A maximum increase of approximately 60% in flexural strength and 70% in fracture toughness are achieved by introducing 0.75 vol % GPLs. In the biocompatibility tests, it was found that cells directly seeding on top of GPL/Al2O3 samples showed better initial attachment (3 h after seeding) and viability (3 days after incubation) than the monolithic Al2O3, indicating that the GPL/Al2O3 composites have comparable or more favorable biocompatibility. The excellent mechanical and biomedical properties of the GPL/Al2O3 composites may enable them to be applied to a wide range of engineering and biomedical applications.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Mechanical, aeronautical and manufacturing engineering
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing
Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing > School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering
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Depositing User: Automatic Import Agent
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2016 11:21
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2016 11:35
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/34002

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