Nutrigenomics 2.0: The Need for Ongoing and Independent Evaluation and Synthesis of Commercial Nutrigenomics Tests' Scientific Knowledge Base for Responsible Innovation

Pavlidis, Cristiana, Nebel, Jean-Christophe, Katsila, Theodora and Patrinos, George P. (2016) Nutrigenomics 2.0: The Need for Ongoing and Independent Evaluation and Synthesis of Commercial Nutrigenomics Tests' Scientific Knowledge Base for Responsible Innovation. OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, 20(2), pp. 65-68. ISSN (print) 1536-2310

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Abstract

Nutrigenomics is an important strand of precision medicine that examines the bidirectional interactions of the genome and nutritional exposures, and attendant health and disease outcomes. This perspectives article presents the new concept of "Nutrigenomics 2.0," so as to cultivate and catalyze the next generation research and funding priorities for responsible and sustainable knowledge-based innovations. We further contextualize our recent study of the 38 genes included in commercially available nutrigenomics tests, and offer additional context in relation to the 2014 American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics position. Finally, we make a call in the best interest of the nutrigenomics science community, governments, global society, and commercial nutrigenomics test providers that new evidence evaluation and synthesis platforms are created concerning nutrigenomics tests before they become commercially available. The proposed assessment and synthesis of nutrigenomics data should be carried out on an ongoing dynamic basis with periodic intervals and/or when there is a specific demand for evidence synthesis, and importantly, in ways that are transparent where conflict of interests are disclosed fully by the involved parties, be they scientists, industry, governments, citizens, social scientists, or ethicists. We submit that this will cultivate responsible innovation, and business models that are sustainable, robust, and stand the test of time and context.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Health services research
Pre-clinical and human biological sciences
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing
Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing > School of Computing and Information Systems
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Depositing User: Susan Miles
Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2016 16:03
Last Modified: 01 Feb 2017 03:31
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/33619

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