The Why of Practice: Utilising PIE to analyse social work practice in Australian hospitals

Nilsson, David, Joubert, Lynette, Holland, Lucy and Posenelli, Sonia (2013) The Why of Practice: Utilising PIE to analyse social work practice in Australian hospitals. Social Work in Health Care, 52(2-3), pp. 280-295. ISSN (print) 0098-1389

Full text not available from this archive.

Abstract

This research used a collaborative approach to gain a comprehensive, quantitative understanding of the breadth and depth of the social work role in health care. Data was collected from individual interviews with all employed hospital social workers (N = 120) across five Melbourne, Australia health networks about their most recently completed case. This data was coded using a revised version of the Karls and Wandrei (1994) Person-in-Environment (PIE) tool to retrospectively analyze the reasons for social work involvement over the course of the case. The findings demonstrate that the hospital social work role is multidimensional across a number of domains but centers predominantly on assisting clients and their significant others with issues of altered social roles and functioning; particularly in relation to role responsibility, dependency, and managing associated role-change losses. The findings of this study will assist hospital social workers, managers, and academics to better describe and effectively undertake this complex work. These findings will also assist in the development of professional training and education to up-skill social workers who operate within this complex setting.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Allied health professions and studies
Health services research
Social work and social policy and administration
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education
Related URLs:
Depositing User: David Nilsson
Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2015 09:51
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2015 09:51
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/32606

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page