Message

On Tuesday October 24th between 7am and 9am, we will carry out scheduled maintenance of the network. During this period of time, there may be potential outages, and the repository may be unavailable.

Thank you for your attention. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Stimulus-response compatibility tests of implicit preference for food and body image to identify people at risk for disordered eating: a validation study

Khan, Saira and Petroczi, Andrea (2015) Stimulus-response compatibility tests of implicit preference for food and body image to identify people at risk for disordered eating: a validation study. Eating Behaviors, 16, pp. 54-63. ISSN (print) 1471-0153

Full text not available from this archive.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to incorporate implicit measures of relevant social cognition into eating disorder research. Fifty-three females diagnosed with an eating disorder (ED), and 41 at-risk females were recruited via ED support websites, along with 23 healthy females for comparison. Computerised online tests assessing subconscious normative ideal body image (IBI-BIAT) and personalised self-identification body image (PBI-BIAT) associations and food preferences (FP-AAT) were administered, followed by the modified version of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Anthropometric data, age, need for social approval, self-reported measures of self-esteem, normative perception and body image satisfaction were recorded. Self-reported diagnosed ED status was corroborated with BMI and EDE-Q. Diagnostic performance of the implicit measures was assessed with ROC analysis. Those diagnosed with ED showed significantly stronger automatic preferences for and self-identification with thin body image, compared to healthy females, but no differences were found in food preferences. The IBI-BIAT showed better diagnostic power than PBI-BIAT, correctly classifying 87% of the diagnosed participants. No correlation was found between IBI-BIAT and the explicit measures. The results suggest that the underlying subconscious social cognitive factors of pathological eating are linked to body image, not to food items per s

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: implicit association test, approach avoidance task, automatic motivation, eating disorder, restricted eating, attitude
Research Area: Allied health professions and studies
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing
Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing > School of Life Sciences
Depositing User: Automatic Import Agent
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2015 19:00
Last Modified: 03 Dec 2015 14:05
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/30236

Actions (Repository Editors)

Item Control Page Item Control Page