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The use of emotions in narratives in Williams syndrome.

Van Herwegen, Jo, Aznar, Ana and Tenenbaum, Harriet (2014) The use of emotions in narratives in Williams syndrome. Journal of Communication Disorders, 50, pp. 1-7. ISSN (print) 0021-9924

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Abstract

Although individuals with Williams syndrome are very sociable, they tend to have limited contact and friendships with peers. In typically developing children the use of positive emotions (e.g., happy) has been argued to be related to peer relationships and popularity. The current study investigated the use and development of emotion words in Williams syndrome using cross-sectional developmental trajectories and examined children's use of different types of emotion words. Nineteen children with Williams syndrome (WS) and 20 typically developing (TD) children matched for chronological age told a story from a wordless picture book. Participants with WS produced a similar number of emotion words compared to the control group and the use of emotion words did not change when plotted against chronological age or vocabulary abilities in either group. However, participants with WS produced more emotion words about sadness. Links between emotion production and friendships as well as future studies are discussed. Learning outcomes: This study provides further insight into the development of emotion production, distinguishing for the first time the production of both positive and negative emotions, in children with a rare developmental disorder, named Williams syndrome. Readers will learn that emotion production is atypical in this population. The implications for social development and peer relationships, as well as future studies are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Research Area: Psychology
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > School of Psychology, Criminology and Sociology (from November 2012)
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Automatic Import Agent
Date Deposited: 18 Mar 2014 11:24
Last Modified: 13 Jan 2015 16:11
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/28001

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