Management of chronic knee pain: a survey of patient preferences and treatment received

Mitchell, Helene L. and Hurley, Michael V. (2008) Management of chronic knee pain: a survey of patient preferences and treatment received. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 9, ISSN (online) 1471-2474

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: A range of interventions exist for the management of knee pain, but patient preferences for treatment are not clear. In this study the management received by people with chronic knee pain, their management preferences and reasons for these preferences were recorded. METHODS: At baseline assessment of a clinical trial of rehabilitation for chronic knee pain, 415 participants were asked about their i) previous management, ii) preferred treatment, if any, iii) whether they would undergo knee surgery and iv) reasons for their preferences. RESULTS: Previous management--Medication was the most common treatment, followed by physiotherapy, 39 participants had received no treatment. Preferences--166 patients expressed no treatment preference. Of those who expressed a preference the most popular option was physiotherapy, whilst not having surgery was the third most frequent response. The most common reason for preferring physiotherapy and not wanting surgery was prior experience.Willingness to accept surgery--390 participants were not waiting for knee replacement surgery, and overall 81% would not accept surgery if offered, usually because pain was not perceived to be severe enough to warrant surgery. CONCLUSION: Most chronic knee pain is managed with medication despite concerns about safety, efficacy and cost, management guidelines recommendations and people's management preferences. Previous experience and perceptions of need were major determinants of people's preferences, but many people were unaware of management options. Appreciating patient preferences and provision of more information about management options are important in facilitating informed patient/clinician discussion and agreement.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Article ID: 123. This work was supported by the Arthritis Research Campaign [grant number H5099].
Research Area: Allied health professions and studies
Health services research
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences (until 2013)
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Depositing User: Katrina Clifford
Date Deposited: 22 Nov 2010 10:23
Last Modified: 16 Jul 2012 21:49
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/17322

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