Fear of dying in an ethnically diverse society: cross-sectional studies of people aged 65+in Britain

Bowling, Ann, Iliffe, Steve, Kessel, Anthony and Higginson, Irene J. (2010) Fear of dying in an ethnically diverse society: cross-sectional studies of people aged 65+in Britain. Postgraduate Medical Journal, 86(1014), 197 - 202. ISSN (print) 0032-5473

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Abstract

Aim To examine fears about dying in an ethnically diverse population sample, and a more homogeneous population sample, aged 65 and over.Methods Personal interviews with people aged 65+ living at home responding to two Office for National Statistics Omnibus Surveys in Britain, and two Ethnibus Surveys of ethnically diverse populations in Britain.Results Ethnically diverse respondents were more likely than British population respondents to express fears about dying on all measures used. Respondents in both samples with better, compared with worse, quality of life had significantly reduced odds of having extreme fears of dying (ethnically diverse sample, OR 0.924 (95% CI 0.898 to 0.951); British population sample, OR 0.981 (95% CI 0.966 to 0.996); both p<0.001). In the latter sample only, older age was protective (OR 0.957; 95% CI 0.930 to 0.985; p<0.001), whereas in the Ethnibus sample, having a longstanding illness (OR 2.024; 95% CI 1.158 to 3.535; p<0.05) and having more relatives to help them (OR 1.134; 95% CI 1.010 to 1.274; p<0.05) increased fears about dying.Conclusions Enabling older people to express fears about dying is likely to be important when planning supportive end-of-life care. Practitioners should not assume that fears about dying are the same in different social groups, or that extensive family support is protective against such anxiety. Older people from ethnic minorities had more anxieties about dying than others, and were more likely to express fears the more extensive their family support. These findings have implications for commissioners and practitioners of primary and secondary care.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: specialist palliative care, quality-of-life, older age, services, health, death
Research Area: Allied health professions and studies
Health services research
Faculty, School or Research Centre: Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences (until 2013)
Depositing User: Susan Miles
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2010 14:07
Last Modified: 16 Jul 2012 21:49
URI: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/id/eprint/17241

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